Getting To The Truth

One of my favorite sayings about the recruiting industry… It’s amazing that only two people don’t tell me the truth… my candidates and my clients.

Yes, it is facetious but also has validity and truth to it.

Googling “not telling the truth in business” yields some amazing truths about the lies.

Some of business “lying” falls in the category of “white lies”. Sometimes recruiters do this protect others as well as themselves.

  • When someone sends a poorly formatted resume and you think it sucks– you probably, more often than not, sugar-coat it and suggest some changes.
  • When a good client throws a really crappy job order your way, do you take it because you have had so much success with them? Even when you do not intend to work on it? This may not be a lie, but is deceptive.
  • When a candidate bombs an interview, do companies give them this feedback? No. They are fearful of litigation and push-back. Companies will say the individual is not a “cultural fit” or they identified someone stronger–when they are not and have not.

When you suspect you are not being told the truth, and the truth is important. You should diplomatically acknowledge this occurs in business, reference the above links. This may put your “liar” at ease by acknowledging the practice. Then you should state your case for wanting and/or needing the information. You may find that you only get a partial truth from the reluctant confessor.

Any acknowledgement may be a great opportunity to win a client or candidates’ respect and trust moving forward.

 

Thank you for joining us at our ROW Lunch today for this discussion!

Written by: Mark Rowbottom, ROW President